Doja Cat Faces Backlash For Alleged Racist Remarks

Guardian Life What's New
Doja Cat

Doja Cat | Highsnobiety

American singer, rapper and songwriter Amalaratna Zandile Dlamini, known professionally as Doja Cat, is facing backlash for alleged racist comments.

The “Say So” hitmaker’s current controversy started after an old song of hers resurfaced on social media on Friday.

The song titled “Dindu Nuffin” was posted all over the internet and the song title which is also the chorus plays on racist themes related to police brutality.

The phrase “Dindu Nuffin” seems to be a stylized pronunciation of “didn’t do nothing.” “Dindu Nuffin” is a phrase people in the Alt-Right spaces of the internet use to describe Black victims of police brutality.

Not only that, but Hollywood Unlocked also shared a video of Doja from a conference call. During this call, she allegedly spoke ill about the black community while talking about not wanting to belong to any particular race.

This has riled up many Twitter users from across the globe against the entertainer who interestingly is born to an American mother and a South African father.

The hashtag #dojacatisover was trending overnight after the outpour of evidence proving that at best Doja Cat comfortably associates with racists.

What makes Doja Cat’s comments even more sensitive is that it is coming on the heels of Lana Del Ray’s racist comments about Doja and some other female pop stars.

Del Ray named these pop stars saying that they “have had number ones with songs about being sexy, wearing no clothes, fucking, cheating etc”.

Doja responded in an Instagram post by posing a rhetorical question:

“Can I please go back to singing about being embodied, feeling beautiful by being in love even if the relationship is not perfect, or dancing for money – or whatever I want – without being crucified or saying that I’m glamorizing abuse??????”

This is the second time the Los Angeles native has caught heat for insensitive rhetoric, the first being the use of a homophobic slur on Twitter and initially defending the use of the word before eventually apologizing.

The Guardian

Leave a Reply